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In the heart of Perth, an 'Aboriginal Sovereign Tent Embassy' and a 'Refugee Camp'

Matargarup Sovereign Embassy - Heirisson Island Wa

A group of First Nations women have established a 'Sovereign Tent Embassy' at Matargarup (Heirisson Island) WA which also hosts a "Refugee Camp" for their homeless sisters and brothers and for the displaced First Nations people from their Homelands. Elder Maureen Culbong said, "We will stand in even stronger numbers together than even the two years ago where we stood for so long. There are so many issues our peoples face that we need the Embassy as a place of sanctity for all those hurting ... " [node:read-more:link]

Cultural appropriation and the portrayal of First Nations Peoples as lesser beings

In a provocative keynote address at the Australian Theatre Forum Ilbijerri Theatre Company's Artistic Director, Rachael Maza, spoke powerfully and passionately about the differences between cultural appropriation and cultural exchange ... It's frightening to see that these condescending productions are accepted and even acclaimed in 2015. These public productions that perpetuate the myths of the invaders is one of the principle reasons that 'Education' urgently needs to provide a more comprehensive understanding of history. [node:read-more:link]

Adnyamathanha, the people of the rocks - songs, stories and Law

Yulu's coal - part one - An amazing audio about "The People of Rocks" - The Adnyamathanha people from the Northern Flinders Ranges in South Australia. This program is about the journey of one of the major Adnyamathanha Creation Ancestors, Yulu the Kingfisher Man. Yulu’s Coal, explores the travels of Yulu as he moved across Country, followed by two Arkurra , Giant Rainbow Serpents and why the coal mined at Leigh Creek Coal Mine today belongs, from an Adnyamathanha perspective, to Yulu, the Kingfisher Man. [node:read-more:link]

Carved trees of First Nations Peoples from Western New South Wales

CULTURAL WARNING - Gamilaroi and Wiradjuri women should note that the Lore prohibits you to view the images on this page. CLICK ANYWHERE HERE TO LEAVE IMMEDIATELY

For thousands of years Aboriginal groups in central NSW marked important ceremonial sites by carving beautiful, ornate designs on the trunks of trees. The carvings, comprising symbolic motifs, intricate swirls, circles and zigzags, were intended to be long-lasting but, instead, only a handful of the trees on which they were carved are still alive today. This page includes many images of carved trees, a pdf booklet and Powerpoint links with more images and information to download. [node:read-more:link]

Slump in recommended First Nations sites receiving heritage listing in WA

Burrup Rock Art
Burrup Rock Art

A steep drop in Aboriginal sites being added to WA's heritage register is leading to "a vast sea of ignorance" that will thwart heritage protection, according to Carmen Lawrence, the chair of the Australian Heritage Council.
After changing the heritage laws to favour mining companies, Aboriginal Affairs Minister said some places "presented as worthy of protection" were "of little or no interest" to Aborigines and that only "the industry of heritage professionals" appeared to value those sites. [node:read-more:link]

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