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First Nations fire methods could slash global emissions: UN report

Indigenous fire methods could slash global emissions says UN

Ancient Indigenous Australian bush-burning could be used around the world to radically cut greenhouse gas emissions, according to United Nations research, which also challenges Prime Minister Tony Abbott's refusal to embrace the purchase of international carbon credits. Abbott has previously said buying overseas offsets sends money "offshore into dodgy carbon farms in Equatorial Guinea and Kazakhstan".

The government this month delayed considering the measure until 2017 or later, saying it would rather make cuts domestically. [node:read-more:link]

David Suzuki: Aboriginal people are our best bet for protecting the planet, not environmentalists,

Academic, author and activist David Suzuki.

Our brains were our great evolutionary advantage, conferring massive memory, curiosity, inventiveness and observational powers ... By applying our acquired knowledge and insights, we could deliberately choose a path to avoid danger or trouble, and to exploit opportunities. I believe foresight was a huge evolutionary advantage for our species. And that's what is so tragic today when we have all the amplified foresight of scientists and supercomputers, which have been warning us for decades that we are heading down a dangerous path, but now we allow politics and economics to override this predictive power. [node:read-more:link]

Evidence for Indigenous Australian Agriculture

From invasion to resistance in Australia

Bulla c1861 conflict Settlers under attack from a First Nations tribe

Capitalism could not flourish without crushing the resistance of people who wanted to live differently ... wage labour and the drive to accumulate capital were incompatible with Aboriginal society. That incompatibility was the basis of the genocide. Across a vast stretch of northern Australia, extending at least from Borroloola to the Kimberley, Aborigines tell the tale of a murderous white man. He stands for whites in general, and is seen as an invader. As quoted in a paper by anthropologist Deborah Bird Rose; "shooting all the people [and] getting ready for the country, trying to take it away". [node:read-more:link]

First Nations patch mosaic burning and varanid lizards: Research suppliment


'Aborigines using fire to hunt kangaroos', by convict artist Joseph Lycett, c1820, watercolour and gouache on paper. (National Library of Australia)

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