History

Proposed development at Deebing Creek mission site would 'destroy our people'

Winyirin (Dooley) Bin Bin the Travelling Lawman who coordinated his countrymen on a pastoral strike from 1942 to 1946

Dooley Bin Bin - Pilbara Strike

The Aboriginal Pilbara Strike.

At the meeting of tribal leaders Winyirin Bin Bin was nominated, in his absence, to work with a non-Aboriginal social reformer, Don McLeod, as a representative of the inland’s Aborigines.

'Dooley' and his kinsman Clancy McKenna sought a minimum wage of thirty shillings per week for Aboriginal station-hands and planned a mass withdrawal of labour if the request were refused. Read more about Winyirin (Dooley) Bin Bin the Travelling Lawman who coordinated his countrymen on a pastoral strike from 1942 to 1946

'Blackfellas' Eureka', The Pilbara's Aboriginal pastoral slaves strike

Don McLeod

Between 1946 and 1949, at least 800 Aboriginal workers walked off stations across the Pilbara led by Nyamal lawman Peter Coppin. Supporting the worker's strike action was a small group of non-indigenous unionists and radicals and it's these activists, in particular Don McLeod, that supported the people in fighting for their rights for wages and freedom of movement. The Aboriginal strikers, who worked on dozens of stock and sheep stations throughout north-west Western Australia, wanted 30 shilling a week minimum wage, freedom of movement for more control over their lives. Read more about 'Blackfellas' Eureka', The Pilbara's Aboriginal pastoral slaves strike

A search for ancestors leads to the most infamous leader of Aboriginal Massacres


Angus McMillan, a Scottish Highlander was credited with founding Gippsland in Victoria by leading hunting parties to track down and massacre groups of First Nations people. He became a hero in Vic and NSW, and is still seen as a heroic explorer. Here is a sample of plaques, monuments and statues made in his honour.

Cal Flyn The Australian 23 April 2016 Read more about A search for ancestors leads to the most infamous leader of Aboriginal Massacres

First Royal Commission on atrocities against Aboriginal prisoners - WA 1905

Frontier history North West Australia 2005

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Notice the tin mug placed in strategic places on the tin wall behind the prisoners - if one wanted a drink or go to the toilet the whole gang would have to go with them. In some cases, people were chained next to a member of a tribal group that is culturally inappropriate to even to speak to, never-loan the different customs and language barriers. It's no wonder they had difficulty fitting into their own family group when they were 'lucky' enough to return to their home. Read more about First Royal Commission on atrocities against Aboriginal prisoners - WA 1905

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