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A search for ancestors leads to the most infamous leader of Aboriginal Massacres


Angus McMillan, a Scottish Highlander was credited with founding Gippsland in Victoria by leading hunting parties to track down and massacre groups of First Nations people. He became a hero in Vic and NSW, and is still seen as a heroic explorer. Here is a sample of plaques, monuments and statues made in his honour.

Cal Flyn The Australian 23 April 2016 Read more about A search for ancestors leads to the most infamous leader of Aboriginal Massacres

First Royal Commission on atrocities against Aboriginal prisoners - WA 1905

Frontier history North West Australia 2005

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Notice the tin mug placed in strategic places on the tin wall behind the prisoners - if one wanted a drink or go to the toilet the whole gang would have to go with them. In some cases, people were chained next to a member of a tribal group that is culturally inappropriate to even to speak to, never-loan the different customs and language barriers. It's no wonder they had difficulty fitting into their own family group when they were 'lucky' enough to return to their home. Read more about First Royal Commission on atrocities against Aboriginal prisoners - WA 1905

Canada: Ditching the Papal Bull(shit) and sovereignty

On May 1, 2016, First nations people from Canada organised a Long March to Rome and met with Pope Francis and requested him to rescind the Papal “Bulls of Discovery”. he Papal Bulls of Discovery are an important piece of a larger idea in international law, called the Discovery Doctrine, which holds that when European nations “discovered” non-European lands, they gained special rights over that land, such as sovereignty and title, regardless of what other peoples live on that land. Read more about Canada: Ditching the Papal Bull(shit) and sovereignty

Aboriginal Smoke Signalling and Signalling Hills in Resistance Warfare

Aboriginal Signalling

Signalling hills and lookouts were of immense importance for Aboriginal groups. They were often pivotal landmarks in the Songlines landscape, major means of communication and education, and tools for co-ordinated hunting or fishing. Their importance is reflected in some Aboriginal place names, for instance Nildottie in South Australia, which actually meant "smoke signal hill."

Aboriginal signalling lookouts are of interest for the role they seem to have played in co-ordinating resistance activities. Read more about Aboriginal Smoke Signalling and Signalling Hills in Resistance Warfare

The difference between the 'First Australians' and the 'First Nations'

Aboriginal people on the continent now known as 'Australia' are not the 'First Australians', they are made up of peoples from the First Nations that all have their own specific names, and in many instances, speak/spoke their own specific language. Therefore as a group they are the First Nations peoples or Original peoples.
 

Read more about The difference between the 'First Australians' and the 'First Nations'>

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