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Tasmania

Tasmanian First Nations peoples skulls return from Chicago Museum

The sacred remains of First Nations people from Tasmania were collected by British soldiers and settlers, who made a bundle of money scavenging the countryside for 'artifacts' and 'collectibles' to send back to motherland collectors during and following the 'Black War'. Captain A W F Fuller was an armchair anthropologist and collector who amassed over 65,000 cataloged items, had a passion for ethnographic artifacts from the South Pacific region (7000 items - over 600 from Australia). He did all this without leaving his armchair in Britain. Read more about Tasmanian First Nations peoples skulls return from Chicago Museum

Tasmania: A Timeline of the History of First Nations People

A comprehensive Timeline for the history of First Nations people in Tasmania. Also incded are some copies of John Glover's landscape paintings, including the Last Muster of Tasmanian Aborigines at Risdon. This painting tells the story of the last group of innocent Tasmanian Aborigines that remains in the Risdon Area before they were deported to Flinders Island. Glover thought the Tasmanian Aborigines would be extinct by that period of time, and when he died in 1849, there were only about 40 Tasmanian Aborigines still alive. Read more about Tasmania: A Timeline of the History of First Nations People

19th century tintype portrait of a young Aboriginal woman from Tasmania found

A rare and haunting image of a young, unidentified Indigenous woman has been donated to the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) after being discovered by a family living in the United Kingdom.

The tiny tintype photograph, measuring about 2 centimetres by 3cm, is the only one of its kind to be held by AIATSIS and is believed to be the oldest in its 650,000-strong photographic collection. Read more about 19th century tintype portrait of a young Aboriginal woman from Tasmania found

Remains of Robbins Island First Nations girl Naungarrika arives home after 200 years

Around 30 First Nations men, women and children were killed and thrown from cliffs in 1828, in one the many British invaders mass murdering sprees. This is known as the Cape Grim massacre. The remains of one of the victims was a young girl named Naungarrika, who finally arrived back to her home state of Tasmania after 200 years of humiliation as a scientific and curiosity trophy.

The First Nations community will decide how to belatedly farewell Nungarrika, but it is likely to be in her own country. Read more about Remains of Robbins Island First Nations girl Naungarrika arives home after 200 years

Remains of First Nation Tasmanians have arrived at Launceston

"We bought our old folk home where they belong, they're finally home," delegation member Dave Warrener said. Read more about Remains of First Nation Tasmanians have arrived at Launceston

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