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Let's have some 'Proper' Truth Telling about the Uluru Statement

Uluru Statement - A Grassroots and Cultural Perspective

Anangu woman Tjimpuna Tjimpuna from the Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara discloses the 'proper' truth about the so-called 'TruthTelling Forum' at the 2018 Garma Festival regarding Constitutional Recognition and the flawed 'Uluru Statement'. The Referendum Council did not have permission to use the Uluru name in the first place, which has serious cultural implications and the First Nations people across the country, especially cultured people who do not use English as their first language were not involved ... but that is just a beginning of the deceit. Read more about Let's have some 'Proper' Truth Telling about the Uluru Statement

Academic Paper argues that First Nations communal allodial land title cannot be extinguished by fraud

Academic Paper argues that First Nations laws of the land still exist

Australian governments want courts, constituted overwhelmingly by non-indigenous lawyers, to decide land disputes as for feudal socage.

This article puts up an argument that Australian indigenous land title is communal allodial title, as a bundle of subsisting rights by operation of Australian Continental Common Law, which therefore cannot be extinguished by the fraud inherent in frame transformation. Read more about Academic Paper argues that First Nations communal allodial land title cannot be extinguished by fraud

Complexity of Treaty and Treaties

Understanding the difference between sovereign treaties under international law, which affirm sovereignty of First Nations, and domestic treaties within the colonial system, which automatically mean First Nations cede sovereignty.

Ghillar, Michael Anderson presents a set of 4 videos to explain the complexities and traps when entering into a Treaty with the Australian government and/or the British Crown. Read more about Complexity of Treaty and Treaties

NSW Bar Association calls for a new approach to Aboriginal imprisonment

ABORIGINAL INCARCERATION

The Bar Association of NSW's submission to a Law Reform Commission inquiry into First Nations incarceration calls for a new approach to sentencing which takes into account the deprivation and disadvantage inherent in an individual's Aboriginal background. The association also calls for an end to mandatory sentences, which make it impossible for courts to make any allowance for such disadvantage in their decisions. The rate at which Aboriginal people end up in jail is appalling and in NSW last year Aboriginal people were 3 per cent of the population, but 24 per cent of the prison population. Read more about NSW Bar Association calls for a new approach to Aboriginal imprisonment

A Statement from the Bush: 'Songlines can bring us Home'

A Statement from the Bush 'Songlines can bring us Home'

Ghillar, Michael Anderson provides an insight into a viable pathway going forward:
At the Referendum Council's National Convention, the line was drawn in the sand. There are no objections to those who want to be absorbed into our oppressor's society. For us who seek to stand and fight, then we must set our sights on looking at the details of how we develop ourselves as self-determining Nations and Peoples, being guided by international legal norms, whilst living next door to our oppressor. Read more about A Statement from the Bush: 'Songlines can bring us Home'

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