Culture

An historic handful of dirt: Whitlam and the legacy of the Wave Hill Walk-Off

Wave Hill 2016

Fifty years ago , on the morning of August 23, 1966, Vincent Lingiari led a walk-off of 200 Gurindji, Mudburra and Warlpiri workers and their families from a remote Northern Territory cattle station, escaping a century of servitude . The families rejected the pleas of their British multinational employer Vestey’s to return to the Wave Hill station, re-occupied an area of their own land at Wattie Creek, and fought until the nation’s leaders heeded their cause. Nine years later, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam symbolically returned the Gurindji’s country with a handful of red dirt. Read more about An historic handful of dirt: Whitlam and the legacy of the Wave Hill Walk-Off

Dare to be wise: Decolonisation underpins the Sovereign Treaties processes

Copy of Sovereign Union Letter (and document) delivered to the United Nations in New York to the Secretary General of the United Nations by Ghillar, Michael Anderson on 16 June 2016. The summary of the 40 page attached document named 'Dare to be wise: Decolonisation underpins the Sovereign Treaties processes in contrast to 'Recognise' which fosters assimilation' is included here along with a link to a pdf copy of the entire document. Read more about Dare to be wise: Decolonisation underpins the Sovereign Treaties processes

The invasion and the non-Aboriginal claim to sovereignty

It must be acknowledged that this country was invaded and this is confirmed by the actions of Captain James Cook when he fired at the first group of Aboriginal people he came in contact with. Then the invaders imprisoned us and interned us in detention centres in the guise of looking after our welfare, protecting us from the barbarous acts of the squatocracy and their militias, supported by the police and redcoats, and then had the audacity to try and establish representative government on the land of others, while we were being imprisoned and killed. Read more about The invasion and the non-Aboriginal claim to sovereignty

'Aboriginal Heritage Act' changes give traditional owners less say: First Nations groups

Proposed changes to South Australia's Aboriginal Heritage Act will reduce powers of traditional owners, according to Indigenous groups.

South Australian Native Title Services chief executive officer Keith Thomas believed amended language in the act would give traditional owners less say over their heritage. "This is going to help people who want to access lands and destroy heritage, rather than improving the protection of Aboriginal heritage," he said. Read more about 'Aboriginal Heritage Act' changes give traditional owners less say: First Nations groups

History repeats: Ethnic cleansing in ACT 1954 and now in WA removal from homelands.

Media Release - 18 December 20143

Australian governments continually and blatantly attack the most vulnerable in our communities and argue that they are concerned for our welfare and the widening 'Gap' in terms of the disparity in our education, etc., while calling us Australian citizens.
But we know we are not Australians citizens under the Australian Constitution and never have been and this is why governments can commit the gross violations of human rights against us and think they can get away with it. Read more about History repeats: Ethnic cleansing in ACT 1954 and now in WA removal from homelands.

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