Activism

Why Being Pro-Black Isn't the Same as Being Anti-White

Why Being Pro-Black Isn't the Same as Being Anti-White

When we have the courage and audacity to reclaim our own humanity, this is how we can heal, this is how we can be better to ourselves and to other people, and this is how we will change the world.

Four Reasons Why Being Pro-Black Isn't the Same as Being Anti-White

 
Wazi Maret Davis Everyday Femenist 16 November 2015 Read more about Why Being Pro-Black Isn't the Same as Being Anti-White

A Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) Explained

A Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) is a formal process leading to the establishment of a fully recognized state, which declares itself an independent and sovereign pre-existing state without a formal agreement with the occupying nation state, because the two have never been together. "Many people are wanting to understand UDIs," said Ghillar Anderson, "This topic will be discussed at the upcoming Gathering of Nations on 21 -22 November 2015 in Old Parliament House, Canberra. There will be opportunities for further discussion during the surrounding days at the Aboriginal Embassy. Read more about A Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) Explained

The invasion and the non-Aboriginal claim to sovereignty

It must be acknowledged that this country was invaded and this is confirmed by the actions of Captain James Cook when he fired at the first group of Aboriginal people he came in contact with. Then the invaders imprisoned us and interned us in detention centres in the guise of looking after our welfare, protecting us from the barbarous acts of the squatocracy and their militias, supported by the police and redcoats, and then had the audacity to try and establish representative government on the land of others, while we were being imprisoned and killed. Read more about The invasion and the non-Aboriginal claim to sovereignty

Winyirin (Dooley) Bin Bin the Travelling Lore Man who coordinated his countrymen on a pastoral strike from 1942 to 1946

Dooley Bin Bin - Pilbara Strike

The Aboriginal Pilbara Strike.

At the meeting of tribal leaders Winyirin Bin Bin was nominated, in his absence, to work with a non-Aboriginal social reformer, Don McLeod, as a representative of the inland’s Aborigines.

'Dooley' and his kinsman Clancy McKenna sought a minimum wage of thirty shillings per week for Aboriginal station-hands and planned a mass withdrawal of labour if the request were refused. Read more about Winyirin (Dooley) Bin Bin the Travelling Lore Man who coordinated his countrymen on a pastoral strike from 1942 to 1946

'Blackfellas' Eureka', The Pilbara's Aboriginal pastoral slaves strike

Don McLeod

Between 1946 and 1949, at least 800 Aboriginal workers walked off stations across the Pilbara led by Nyamal lawman Peter Coppin. Supporting the worker's strike action was a small group of non-indigenous unionists and radicals and it's these activists, in particular Don McLeod, that supported the people in fighting for their rights for wages and freedom of movement. The Aboriginal strikers, who worked on dozens of stock and sheep stations throughout north-west Western Australia, wanted 30 shilling a week minimum wage, freedom of movement for more control over their lives. Read more about 'Blackfellas' Eureka', The Pilbara's Aboriginal pastoral slaves strike

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