Self-determination

1926 plan for an Aboriginal state and to teach Aboriginals how to live on 'country'

1926 plan for an Aboriginal state and to teach Aboriginals how to live on 'country'

In 1926 a group of colonists with self acclaimed 'high moral standards' and with a small touch of guilt, came up with the idea to create an Aboriginal state. The idea was to give Arnhem Land to Aboriginal people and teach them how to be self-sufficient ... "It is a bold scheme, but the committee behind it includes men who know the aborigine, and who have sufficient faith in it to call for signatures to a petition to be presented to the Commonwealth Parliament asking for its inauguration" Read more about 1926 plan for an Aboriginal state and to teach Aboriginals how to live on 'country'

First Nations grower group planting native youlks

Lesley Williams

The 'youlk' looks similar to a kipfler potato and grows in poor sandy soil, which is unsuitable for grain growing or grazing and is now being farmed by an Aboriginal growing group in south west WA as a pilot for more groups. The growing group project is expected to run like other mainstream grower groups. But it is a customised group for Aboriginal farmers as many Indigenous-owned farming properties had different management logistics to other modern-day farms. In some cases, there are 20 members and in some cases 120 members so it is a whole different dynamic to the colonial farming protocol. Read more about First Nations grower group planting native youlks

Recognition hits another Treaty wall on their road to enforce assimilation

Tasmania Treaty Demands
Rodney Gibbons and Wendy Moore outside Hobart. (The Australian Pic: Peter Mathew)

Stephen Fitzpatrick The Australian 12 December 2016

Constitutional recognition of First Nations people has been blindsided by more demands, with an official forum in Hobart insisting that plans for a referendum must be accompanied by Treaty talks. Read more about Recognition hits another Treaty wall on their road to enforce assimilation

Annual Gathering reignites debate on constitutional recognition

Constitutional Recognition

Gamilaroi man, and founder of the Sovereign Union, Mr Ghillar Anderson, is preparing to lead discussions on a variety of issues including First Nations People's sovereignty, and the government's proposed constitutional changes. "The Sovereign Union is about bringing people together to share our experiences and get a way forward as a collective group of people", says Mr Anderson. - The proposed changes are being promoted through a government-funded campaign, 'Recognise', which is currently making its way around the nation. Read more about Annual Gathering reignites debate on constitutional recognition

Are Aboriginal mothers too scared to ask for help in case it results having their children stolen?

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Self-determination