Before Invasion

How First Nations people survived through the Ice Age

Southeast Asia and Australia during the last Ice Age. (Photo: Migration Heritage NSW)

Wes Judd Australian Geographic 27 September 2013 [node:read-more:link]

Mapping the massacres of Queensland Aboriginal society

'Conspiracy Of Silence' - Blood baths of the past by Dr T Bottoms
The Queensland frontier was more violent than any other Australian colony. Dr Bottoms uses new original research in his book to expose the Queensland massacres.

The 'Treachery' began in 1770 - the 'Genocide' began in 1788

Captain James Cook Journal - 30 April 1770
As Soon as the Wooders and Waterers were come on board to Dinner 10 or 12 of the Natives came to the watering place, and took away their Canoes that lay there, but did not offer to touch any one of our Casks that had been left ashore; and in the afternoon 16 or 18 of them came boldly up to within 100 yards of our people at the watering place, and there made a stand.

Mr. Hicks, who was the Officer ashore, did all in his power to intice them to him by offering them presents; but it was to no purpose, all they seem'd to want was for us to be gone. After staying a Short time they went away. They were all Arm'd with Darts and wooden Swords; the darts have each 4 prongs, and pointed with fish bones. Those we have seen seem to be intended more for striking fish than offensive Weapons; neither are they poisoned, as we at first thought.

Australia's first people were Australia's first farmers

Far from being hunters and gatherers, the first Australians may have managed the biggest

farming estate on Earth, writes Tony Stephens.

The still common assumption is that Aboriginal Australians in 1788 were simple hunter-gatherers who relied on chance for survival and moulded their lives to the country where they lived. Historian Bill Gammage might have driven the last nail into the coffin of this notion.

Gammage draws striking conclusions from more than a decade's research. [node:read-more:link]

First Nations 'Fire Hunting' benefits small-mammals: Research

Stanford University Report, July 12, 2012

Hunting with fire appears to benefit Australia's small-mammal populations, say Stanford researchers

Western Australia's Martu people set small fires as a matter of course while hunting lizards. But the technique may also buffer the landscape against two extremes – overgrown brush and widespread lightning fires – that hurt Australia's endangered small mammals.

BY MAX MCCLURE [node:read-more:link]

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