Culture

Pigments and palettes from the past – science of First Nations peoples art

Indigenous Art

The practices of First Nations people, honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we look at different aspects of their life and uncover the knowledge behind them. Here we examine the chemistry and techniques behind perhaps the most iconic element of Indigenous life: rock art. - An article by Andrew Thorn, Lecturer in Stone Conservation, from the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property [node:read-more:link]

Barnett Strips Dreaming of Heritage Status

WA Premier, Colin Barnett

In the past two years about 1500 sites have changed from being "registered" to "stored data", meaning they no longer warrant heritage protection. stated Academic, Professor Joe Dortch.

Most of those sites are in mining leaseholds belonging to Gina Rinehart and Andrew Forrest.Anthropologists are aghast at the interpretation, saying it's further evidence the Barnett government is taking Aboriginal heritage back 40 years. [node:read-more:link]

The man who calls himself by an Aboriginal name appears to have no interest in Aboriginality

The article 'Jobs and education are the lifters' by: Nyunggai Warren Mundine, The Australian 3 December 2014 with Comments by Maurene Brannan

... as if it meant nothing, which it apparently doesn't to Warren - 'cultural authority' does not come easy, it takes a lifetime of dedication and education in the highest, most evolved culture on Earth. [node:read-more:link]

Terra nullius never went away

Past experiences of forced removal off country have proved disastrous. The result is more fringe dwellers, social problems, suicides and incarceration. Western Australia already has the highest rate of incarceration of Indigenous people, around 20 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. In fact Barnett hypocritically admitted that it “will cause great distress to Aboriginal people who will move, it will cause issues in regional towns as Aboriginal people move into them.” [node:read-more:link]

Cost of closing remote communities greater than tackling issues, Aboriginal leaders say

Aboriginal leaders and advocates are warning the "chaos and dysfunction" caused by closing down remote Indigenous communities will cost the West Australian Government far more than addressing existing issues. Amnesty International's indigenous peoples' rights manager Tammy Solonec said there was no plan to help people when Ooombulgurri community was closed down and people were required to integrate into Wyndham or other towns, leaving them "highly traumatised". [node:read-more:link]

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