Politics

First Nations rock art is at risk

Recognition Bill forced on First Nations people against their will

On February 7 the Australian Senate will vote on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Recognition Bill 2012 despite overwhelming opposition to constitutional inclusion by the majority of Aboriginal people and the government's own acknowledgement that the proposed changes to the constitution would be rejected by a referendum.

“This shows the paternalistic contempt that the Federal Government and politicians have for Aboriginal people has not changed in 112 years,” said Kooma man, Wayne Wharton, of the Brisbane Aboriginal Sovereign Embassy.

Brisbane Protest - Wednesday February 6 at Wayne Swan's electoral office at 8am
(1162 Sandgate Rd, Nundah) - Flyer Download

Urgent Protest on the Governments constitutional recognition bill

First Nations people are urgently requested to attend a Protest at Parliament House, Canberra this Thursday 7th February.

The Australian government intends to continue debate and vote on the bill for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples recognition, Labor's alternative bill to the referendum on constitutional recognition.

This rush appears to be a set-up to kill off the growing concerns regarding the legislation among First Nations people and serve as a cover-up of the governments human rights and discrimination record and their contempt towards First Nations people.

Thursday 7th - Meet at Embassy 8:30am - Outside Parliament house 9:00am
DOWNLOAD URGENT PROTEST FLYER

Follow:  Vote No to Constitutional Change

Read more about Recognition Bill forced on First Nations people against their will

Australia's First peoples worse off than 40 years ago

"Remembering the past to understand the present and create a new future"

  Read more about Australia's First peoples worse off than 40 years ago

John Howard recognised continuing Aboriginal sovereignty in his Ten Point Plan for limiting Native Title


Former PM, John Howard

With the passage of time it is now painfully obvious that former Prime Minister, John Howard, fully realised that Aboriginal peoples maintain a very powerful position in Australia, so much so, that by amending the Native Title Act in 1998 he demonstrated the inherent power of Aboriginal peoples, which stems from our continuing sovereignty.

Having now reviewed his Ten Point Plan it is important for us, as First Nations Peoples, to revisit John Howard’s amendments and what they meant.

Howard’s Ten Point Plan promised ‘bucket loads’ of extinguishment of Native Title after the Wik decision, in which the High Court found that Native Title continued to exist on pastoral leases in Queensland. This sent the Howard government into a fervent need to create ‘certainty’ for the non-Aboriginal landholders, driven by the fear in existing landholders of our continuing connection to Country.

Read more about John Howard recognised continuing Aboriginal sovereignty in his Ten Point Plan for limiting Native Title

Commonsense and good faith buried under balance sheets and destruction

A health report back in 2004 by UNSW had concluded that if you give the Original peoples substantive power in their own affairs, encourage and support them in taking responsibility for themselves, offer them assistance as they design tools for the exercise of that power, then they will progress remarkably well.

Australian governments follow their own bogus reports so they can continue to ensure suppression and disposession - (Genocide and Grand Theft). Read more about Commonsense and good faith buried under balance sheets and destruction

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Politics